Tag Archives: reverence

Readings

“There is not a day that goes by that I do not think about what you said.” The woman on the phone takes a breath with her next pause and, then proceeds,  “I suppose I wanted to tell you this in order to validate the work that you do.”

Spirituality
Spirituality

On the telephone with a peripheral acquaintance, I am talking with someone with whom I very rarely communicate. She has been battling breast cancer for more than two years.

Over ten years ago, as a gift to celebrate a personal, life transition, I facilitated an energetic rebalancing session, which included a “reading.” During the session, I related to her that a grey film in her energetic field appeared to be covering one breast and that her body might need additional selenium to help shift out or release this non-luminescent film.  This is one of the potential gifts of second sight—preemptive self-care.

In truth, I had forgotten about both this session and its details. As I tried to recall the where and when of our session, she continues speaking, “I wanted you to know that selenium is used as a supplement to help support cancer patients.” Our conversation soon concludes.

For some time, feelings of gravity regarding our short exchange do not lift from my heart. I recall the many occasions I had hoped that an energetic session might cause a profound, positive series of changes in someone’s life, inspire an altered and more optimal life routine or open up a sense of reverence for the gift of any given day.

It is true, that on rare occasions, I might receive a short note of gratitude or some helpful feedback about the profundity of the work. Yet, what caused my heart so much heaviness in general was that, during most sessions, I never felt that the Grace extended was ever acknowledged in a way that made me feel sufficiently full or that the Light was properly acknowledged. (I am aware that these observations may say something more about some deficiency in me than anything else.)

Visiting a Light worker, who may employ almost any alternative-care modality, is a stretch for most people. Know that it takes a great deal of commitment, exceptional self-care and a lot of devotional work, on the part of a dedicated practitioner, to remain clear and connected to be able to facilitate such a session—on behalf of the Light residing in another. Listening, really listening, to bodies, personal rhythms, guardian Angels, as well as for topical and sacred feedback, requires clarity and effort.

Thus, if life circumstances ever cause you to cross the threshold of an alternative-care practitioner’s space, who is committed to working with the Light, go with a pure and open heart ready to turn. There is nothing idle about Grace.

Associations

Cold, windy and biting is an accurate description of the weather on the day I visit the post office. To protect my ears and neck from the wily and brutal winds outside, I have bundled up in one of my extra-long headscarves. With bright red, wind-chapped cheeks and a frozen nose, I imagine I am quite a sight after a full, four-mile walk.

Spirituality

Moving from the expansive post-office foyer into the line for counter service, I attempt to warm my stiff, cold and almost immoveable hands as I try to remove my gloves. Having crossed the threshold into the warmer counter-for-service area, I observe a postal worker shift through a series of complex body postures as he sees me entering the line.

Initially, he is merely doing his job. Then, as he notices me entering the line, I observe his body stiffen, until he is standing ram-rod straight—rigid. All of his working movements become uncomfortably tense and robotic.

With my fingers slowly thawing, I search my mind for a possible reason why my appearance in line would cause this worker so much discomfort.  Reaching up to unwind my headscarf, memories of living within an international, graduate-school housing community come flooding in.

It was while my husband was in graduate school and we were in university graduate apartments that, to my amazement and for the first (and only) time in my recollection, I qualified as something of a head-turner—but only among men of near-Middle-Eastern or Middle-Eastern origin. I consider the fact that, in terms of visual presentation, I am equally at home at a Greek dance party, a Sufi zhikr or a Jewish celebration.

Parallel to the unwinding of my headscarf, I observe the rigid tension melting out of this man’s body. With my long scarf now resting down the full length of my coat, I consider the fact that former military personnel are awarded extra points on the civil service examinations required of all postal workers, points which civilian test-takers must earn through extra high scores. Perhaps this man has seen active duty in the military.

What an odd encounter. We have not met. We have not spoken. And, yet, through whatever internalized, experiential markers this man carries within him, I was most certainly perceived as an uncomfortable form of “Other.” No matter what my mind postulates, my heart feels a deep sorrow for this man because my own experiences as a guest among Middle-Eastern peoples has given me a completely different set of positive, internalized social markers.

In travelling internationally, what I have learned is this. Among persons who are authentic seekers of a better life and who remain focused on the greater good, our greatest human concerns have to do with the love and respect we hold for one another in the context of family, as well as the desire for a better, safer world for our children. It is that simple.